Myofascial Release

Myofascial Release is one of my favorite techniques and a scientific reality that I get very excited about.

Why?

Because, according to new researchers, we have more fascia in our body than any other connective tissue. If you have ever cooked a raw chicken with its skin still on, the white, papery web between the skin and muscle is a clear visual of fascia.

Fascia in muscles, around muscles, in and around bones, connecting bone to muscle and bone to bone, holding blood vessels in place, in the spinal column and surrounding the brain.

Fascia is everywhere.

Many pains that are felt as muscular pains can often be traced back to fascial restrictions in an arm, leg, shoulder, hip, torso, neck, or head. A fascial restriction in the hip can cause symptoms in the shoulders. A restriction in the stomach or liver can affect the neck or shoulders.

Myofascial dysfunction can appear as a variety of symptoms from headaches to hip pain to foot pain - and because of fascia around the organs and in the abdominal cavity, it can even impact digestion.

Where Myofascial Dysfunction Comes From

Anne Williams in Massage Mastery summarizes common causes of myofascial dysfunction in the following:

  • Postural Habits

  • Diet

  • Repetitive Mechanical Stress

  • Injury

  • Chronic Stress

  • Lifestyle

Postural habits can lead fascia to thicken in certain areas while muscles assume static positions to brace the body. Poor nutrition and dehydration can affect of the ground substance in connective tissue, causing it to thicken and bond. Repetitive motions such as rotating the wrist while cutting hair or leaning over while doing dental work can create stress and trauma in tissue that leads to adhesions and thickening of fascia, which in turn can compress nerves, blood vessels, and lymphatic vessels, impacting circulation worsening the condition.

Remodeling tissue after an injury can create imbalance in shortened and bound tissue. Injury related to surgery and scarring can restrict tissue and cause decreased range of motion in the body. Chemicals released as of part of the fight-and-flight (stress) response causes changes to connective tissue, therefore causing wounds, fractures, muscle strains, tendon sprains, and joint injuries to heal more slowly or incorrectly.

Lastly, a sedentary lifestyle and habits such as smoking can change the body’s internal chemistry and influence the ground substance in fascia, causing it to thicken, decrease in circulation and mobility, and increase susceptibility to illness and disease.

Image of horizontal fascial planes on the body. Fascia is what gives shape, hold, and structure to the body. It is the connection between muscle and bone, joints, and blood and lymphatic vessels.   Image credit of Anne Williams’ Massage Mastery, (p. 594)

Image of horizontal fascial planes on the body. Fascia is what gives shape, hold, and structure to the body. It is the connection between muscle and bone, joints, and blood and lymphatic vessels.

Image credit of Anne Williams’ Massage Mastery, (p. 594)

Like a sweater that can lay flat or bunch up if any of the strands are pulled out, fascia can lie smoothly across our body or get pulled in differently directions, causing pain or restricted motion either locally or far away from the area of restriction.

Like a sweater that can lay flat or bunch up if any of the strands are pulled out, fascia can lie smoothly across our body or get pulled in differently directions, causing pain or restricted motion either locally or far away from the area of restriction.

 

How to Treat Myofascial Dysfunction

We use techniques that unwind and unbind fascial restrictions in the body. We also teach you techniques you can do yourself to treat fascial restrictions yourself. What’s even more exciting is that, while fascial restrictions can take time to unwind, the long-term effects of healing fascia can last for a lifetime.

Come in today and see if myofascial release can help you!